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Chorley Historical and Archaeological Society

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Jan 2016
 

Sun 31 Jan 2016
Anne Bradley: Obituary

Sorry for the late posting but I have only just heard of the death of local Historian Anne Bradley of Hoghton.
Anne published many articles about local history and because of this a lot of her work will live on.
Anne died on 8th Dec 2015 at Sherwood Court Care Home. She was 89 years old.
The Committal Service was at Pleasington Crematorium on Tuesday 22nd December.
This photo as Anne with Cllr Eric Bell when he was Chorley’s Mayor at the unveiling of the St Helen’s Well memorial cross, Whittle-le-Woods in May 2004.

 

Sat 23 Jan 2016
Brindle Lodge Folly.

The Brindle & Hoghton history pages on Facebook are run by local historian Steve Williams.
On Thu 21 & Fri 22 Jan 2016 he posted some fascinating old pictures of the Folly in the grounds of Brindle Lodge, off the Blackburn Preston Road, Hoghton Lane A675.
It is know locally as the "Voodoo Tower"


Brindle Lodge


Old photo of the Folly


The Folly today

The structure is grade 2 listed and the description is:
Folly in Grounds of Brindle Lodge Grade: II English Heritage Building ID: 184294
The listing text says:
Folly, probably early to mid C19. Red brick, red sandstone random rubble, and gritstone. Small circular tower, c.5 metres high, of random rubble, and attached at the base a small roofless enclosure of loosely Gothic intention, with 2 archways, a pointed arched window, and some ex situ fragments including a large rectangular stone with a fish carved on it, and a date stone inscribed 1639. Item is close to Preston to Blackburn railway, and may have been built in some relationship to it.


The structure is in the private grounds of Brindle Lodge and there is no public access to it. The following information and photographs are intended to give all the information that I obtained from my authorised visit so there is no need to try and make an unauthorised entry.
Comments on Facebook mentioned children gaining access many years ago by sneaking in by various routes. There are some public footpaths with lovely views around the area and I recently saw a local farmer who told me about the folly and how children would gain access via a bridge over the nearby railway. The bridge has now gone.
 
 


I thought the only way to investigate further was to visit Brindle Lodge and ask permission from the owner. The first time I called he wasn’t in but on Sat 23 Jan he was. He was very helpful and said it was OK to photograph the folly. To get there we had to go through a gate in a high wall and across his private garden area. The folly was still the same as shown on the old photos except the tower, which is now covered in ivy.


The Tower staircase


The main structure is a circular tower about 5 metres high with a spiral stone staircase going up the centre. It is of random stone and the oldest part of the structure, though it is not possible to say how old. The adjacent Brindle Lodge is said to date from 1809 and the tower could be from then or older.
Yates’ Map of 1786 doesn’t show it. The 6in to one mile Ordnance Survey map of 1848 shows it as just a tower. The 1892 1/2500 O.S. map shows the tower and adjacent Gothic walls attached. The walls, arches and window frames are of dressed stone with random infill and appear to be from various locations. They are not keyed in to the tower so were probably added later. The listing description mentions a date stone of 1639 which has been removed from the structure by the owner for safekeeping. The stone will have been reclaimed from elsewhere and does not date the structure.

The adjacent Brindle Lodge is also a grade 2 listed building and has a better documented history. I believe Steve will be investigating more details about it and adding them to the Brindle and Hoghton Facebook pages.
Below are some additional photos taken at night (Sat 30 Jan 2016) using artificial light for illumination.


The 1639 date stone removed for safekeeping


 


 
Boyd Harris

 

Tue 12 Jan 2016
Diving into History by Boyd Harris.

The presentation covered two main areas of underwater archaeology undertaken by members of Chorley Sub-Aqua Club.
1. The remains of the sunken German Fleet that was scuttled in Scapa Flow, Orkney in 1919
2. The excavation of the first Royal Yacht ‘Mary’ which hit rocks off the Skerries, Anglesey and sank in 1675.

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Scapa Flow, Orkney was the base for the British Grand Fleet.
Following the German defeat in WWI, 74 ships of the German High Seas Fleet were interned at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles.
On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed. He didn’t know the signing of the treaty had been delayed.


Port side on the Coln

The Treaty of Versailles ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919.
During the 1920s and 1930s the majority of the scuttled ships of the German High Seas Fleet were raised. It was one of the largest maritime salvage operations in history. Of the 52 ships that sank, only 7 remain beneath the waters of Scapa Flow.


The German Fleet in Scapa Flow 1919 before being scuttled. 

Scapa Flow, Orkney was the base for the British Grand Fleet.
Following the German defeat in WWI, 74 ships of the German High Seas Fleet were interned at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles.
On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed. He didn’t know the signing of the treaty had been delayed.


Bow of the Brummer.

Between 1924 and 1931 Cox & Danks Shipbreaking Co. successfully raised 35 ships of the German fleet.
Stromness Salvage Company and the Scapa Flow Salvage and Shipbreaking Company also raised ships.
Several were raised by sealing the ships from the inside and blowing air into them so they floated to the surface upside down. Some were towed upside down to the dry docks at Rosyth on the Firth of Forth.
During the 1970s Chorley Sub-Aqua Club members visited Orkney to dive on some of the remaining German wrecks. At the time there was little control on diving the wrecks.
The wrecks of the Coln, Brummer, Dresden, Karlsruhe, Kronprinz Wilhelm, Markgraf and Konig remain.
The main ones of interest were the:
Coln light cruiser Displacement: 5,620t.
Brummer light cruiser Displacement: Design: 4,385t.
Both wrecks lie on their side in about 35m depth of water.
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The Royal Yacht Mary.
On 11th July 1971 members of Chorley Sub-Aqua Club were diving off the Skerries rocks off Anglesey when a bronze canon was found lying on the seabed. It turned out to be from the wreck of the ‘Mary’ sunk in 1675.
It was a Dutch 4 pounder 6ft long and 560lb.
A team of divers from Merseyside had also been diving the area and found other canon, but these were mostly English 3 pounders.
Both groups teamed up to excavate the wreck.
 

Background:
On 3 Sep 1651 King Charles II lost the Battle of Worcester to Cromwell, thereby ending the Civil War.
He managed to escape the country to France and eventually ended up being exiled in Holland. While there he was impressed with their fast sailing vessels. The MARY was built by the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1660 and purchased by the City of Amsterdam, embellished and given to Charles II when he was restored to the English throne. She then became the first Royal Yacht.
Sir John Evelyn wrote in his diary 1 Oct 1661
“I sailed this morning in one of his Yachts or pleasure boats, vessels not known among us till the Dutch East India Company presented that curious piece to the King, being excellent sailing vessel.”


Charles II

The Mary was 100 tons displacement, 52ft (16m) long * 19ft (6m), 10ft (3m) draught.
Charles II enjoyed racing her and after owning her for a year he commissioned the Katherine as a faster replacement.
Mary was then used for transporting diplomats and civil servants and was used regularly for journeys across the Irish Sea between Dublin and Holyhead.


The Mary

On 25 March 1675 she was sailing from Dublin to Chester with 74 on board; 28crew & 46 passengers. There were no lighthouses in those days and she hit the Skerries rocks off Anglesey. 39 scrambled ashore but 35 died including Capt. Burstow.
Following the discovery in 1971 the divers teamed up the staff of Merseyside Maritime Museum to carry out underwater excavations to recover and document the remains before looters arrived.


11th July 1971 Dutch 4 pounder

The ‘Mary’ and also Henry VIII’s ‘Mary Rose’ wreck prompted the introduction of the ‘Protection of Wreck Act’ 1973.
She was designated as a protected site on 20 January 1974.
To continue the excavations Chorley divers had to obtain a license that was renewed annually. Surveys and reports were submitted as part of the excavation process.
The many artefacts recovered, including the full complement of bronze canon, are in Merseyside Maritime Museum.


The bronze guns


One of those who went down with the ship


Silver tankard


The door in Worcester where Charles II
escaped Cromwell in 1651


Gold locket with hair inside